CELLULAR JAIL (National Memorial)

Cellular JailCellular Jail, located at Port Blair, is a mute witness to the tortures meted out to the freedom fighters, who were incarcerated in this Jail. The Jail, completed in the year 1906 acquired the name, 'cellular' because it is entirely made up of individual cells for the solitary confinement of the prisoners. It originally was a seven pronged, puce colored building with a Central Tower acting as its fulcrum and a massive structure comprising honey-comb like corridors. The building was subsequently damaged and presently three out of seven prongs are intact. The Jail now a place of pilgrimage for all freedom loving people, has been declared a National Memorial. Netaji Subash Chandra Bose hoisted the first Tri-Color on 30th December, 1943 at a place near this Jail. During the 50th year of India's Independence, the living freedom fighters and widows of the freedom fighters, who were incarcerated in the Cellular Jail were honored by the President of India on 30th December, 1997. A commemorative coin and a postal stamp on Cellular Jail were also released on this occasion.

There is a Museum and an Art Gallery which is open on all days except Monday from 9.00 AM to 12 Noon and 2.00 PM to 5.00 PM. This structure was constructed during the colonial regime in order to form a prison which has now become a memorial of Indian freedom fighters. This jail witnessed the heart wrenching cries of the Indian freedom fighters who lived their lives here in total despair knowing only too well that they would never return to their homeland, India. Every evening, there is a revealing light and sound show that is based on the lives led by the prisoners.

SOUND & LIGHT SHOW

The saga of the heroic freedom struggle is brought alive in a moving Sound & Light show. The show is conducted every evening in the premises of cellular jail which gives us a brief idea about the happenings in the jail prior to the independence